2012 Draft recap

Posted: August 24, 2012 in Fantasy Football, humor, sports
Tags: ,

Ok, man you guys are impatient! Here is the draft recap. It isn’t as funny (I hope) as mine are but they are a very good respected fantasy site. What I did is input our league data into the Football Guys site that rates everyone’s drafts. I will copy and paste the important parts (they go into greater detail in their individual emails) but if you want the full blown stuff lemme know and I will email it over to you. OK, here goes! I realize as I did this that although it was a lot of inputting info it really isn’t MY take per se. So if you guys would rather that (or, more accurately in addition too…) I think I can do that as well. Just let me know!

First up the defending Champ:

warriors, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Matt Ryan, Ben Roethlisberger
RB: Ray Rice, Fred Jackson, BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Willis McGahee, DeAngelo Williams, Toby Gerhart
WR: A.J. Green, Percy Harvin, Steve Johnson, Nate Washington
TE: Jimmy Graham, Brandon Pettigrew
PK: Robbie Gould
TD: Denver Broncos

Overview:

Old school!

We like your overall strength at the traditionally less important positions, but make no mistake about it: this team is about strength at the running back position. And we think it will be the league favorite or very close to it. Somewhere Terrell Davis is smiling.

Nonetheless, we’d be remiss if we didn’t at least mention the relative lack of strength at quarterback and receiver. These are usually survivable weaknesses, but we’d feel better if we knew you were committed to zealously scouring the waiver wire for this year’s emergent players at QB and WR. Getting a breakout player at one or both of those positions would take your already-good team to the next level.

Players we particularly like on this team include Percy Harvin, A.J. Green, Steve Johnson, Brandon Pettigrew, Fred Jackson, and DeAngelo Williams. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 99 percent chance of  making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 99 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 92 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 11 of 2010:

Steve Johnson vs. CIN: 137 receiving yards, 3 TD
Ben Roethlisberger vs. OAK: 275 passing yards, 55 rushing yards, 4 TD
Fred Jackson vs. CIN: 129 combined yards, 2 TD
Ray Rice vs. CAR: 131 combined yards, 1 TD
BenJarvus Green-Ellis vs. IND: 100 combined yards, 1 TD

QB Summary:

We have Matt Ryan rated #7 among quarterbacks, which makes him a viable starter if not an exciting one. Ben Roethlisberger, our #13 quarterback, should be solid as a backup, but we’re not sure if he can hold down the fort as a starter if circumstances force him to be one.

Incidentally, these two have a terrific combined schedule and a decent playoff schedule too. If you simply played the one with the better matchup each week, this is the schedule you’d face:

DEN | DEN | OAK | CAR | PHI | OAK | CIN | PHI | NYG | NO | ARI | TB | NO | SD | NYG | CIN

RB Summary:

Nice work here. We like both your starting running backs, as our projections indicate that they give you a combined 4.1 point-per-game advantage over an average opponent in this league. Our projections have Ray Rice ranked at #2 and Fred Jackson ranked at #12.

Your bench also looks good. BenJarvus Green-Ellis should serve as a very solid third running back; he’s a likely flex starter. Likewise, Willis McGahee should be excellent at RB4.

Since you’re strong at the position, you probably don’t absolutely need to roster more than four players here. Of your remaining guys, we like DeAngelo Williams the best, but you should keep the one you think has the best chance of putting up starter numbers. The rest might be considered expendable if you find you need roster space elsewhere.

A quick note about the same-team Jackson/Steve Johnson and Green-Ellis/A.J. Green duos you’ve got here. Though the effect is probably negligible, this kind of pairing is likely to make your team more (not less) consistent than a comparable-scoring different-team pair. See this article (which was written before the 2008 season) for more discussion.

WR Summary:

While your lack of depth at the position concerns us, we do like all your starting receivers, as our projections indicate that they give you a combined 1.1 point-per-game advantage over an average opponent in this league. A.J. Green is our fifth ranked WR, Percy Harvin is #12, and we have Steve Johnson 18th.

We see Nate Washington as an average fourth receiver.

We might suggest adding a bit more depth here. See the end of the report for some suggestions on who to pick up.

Nate Washington is ranked #21 by some of our writers, which would make him a great fourth receiver and even a legitimate WR3. Mark Wimer reasons, “Washington does well whether Matt Hasselbeck or Jake Locker is slinging the football, and Kenny Britt has a nagging knee injury and Britt faces a strong potential challenge from Kendall Wright for playing time if Britt can’t get up to speed during training camp. Washington had a career year last season, but he seems to be the most secure fixture on the wide receiver’s depth chart – I see no reason he can’t at least replicate a 70/1,000/7 type season during 2012. The pessimism about Washington on other ranking boards seems unjustified, especially given Britt’s latest arrest (DUI).”

TE Summary:

As you are well aware, Jimmy Graham is an elite tight end. We have him ranked first overall at the position. He’s about 3.5 points per game better than an average starting TE in this league. We also think Brandon Pettigrew is a starting quality tight end in this league. He’s a luxury.

Kicker Summary:

We don’t think Robbie Gould is starter quality in this league. Keep a sharp eye on the waiver wire.

Defense Summary:

When you don’t have an elite defense, one option is a committee approach. That is, try to get two cheap defenses whose schedules fit well together

LOD, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Robert Griffin III, Philip Rivers
RB: Arian Foster, Marshawn Lynch, Maurice Jones-Drew, Rashad Jennings, Pierre Thomas
WR: Brandon Lloyd, Pierre Garcon, Malcom Floyd, Reggie Wayne, Justin Blackmon
TE: Antonio Gates, Fred Davis
PK: Dan Bailey
TD: Detroit Lions

Overview:

Old school!

We like your overall strength at the traditionally less important positions, but make no mistake about it: this team is about strength at the running back position. And we think it will be among the top teams in the league. Somewhere Marshall Faulk is smiling.

Nonetheless, we’d be remiss if we didn’t at least mention the relative lack of strength at quarterback and receiver. These are usually survivable weaknesses, but we’d feel better if we knew you were committed to zealously scouring the waiver wire for this year’s emergent players at QB and WR. Getting a breakout player at one or both of those positions would take your already-good team to the next level.

Players we particularly like on this team include Rashad Jennings, Pierre Thomas, Philip Rivers, and the Lions defense. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 90 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 85 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 77 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 13 of 2011:

Pierre Garcon vs. NE: 150 receiving yards, 2 TD
Marshawn Lynch vs. PHI: 148 combined yards, 2 TD
Maurice Jones-Drew vs. SD: 188 combined yards, 1 TD
Arian Foster vs. ATL: 152 combined yards, 1 TD
Malcom Floyd vs. JAX: 108 receiving yards, 1 TD
Philip Rivers vs. JAX: 294 passing yards, 3 TD

QB Summary:

We have Robert Griffin III rated #9 among quarterbacks, which makes him a less-than-stellar starter in this league. But we like the selection of our #10-rated QB, Philip Rivers, to go with him. Hopefully between the two of them, you should be able to cobble together some good production at the position, but this strategy always carries with it the downside that you’ll drive yourself crazy trying to decide who to start from week to week.

Incidentally, these two have a pretty nice combined schedule and a decent playoff schedule too. If you simply played the one with the better matchup each week, this is the schedule you’d face:

OAK | TEN | CIN | TB | NO | MIN | NYG | CLE | CAR | TB | DEN | DAL | NYG | BAL | CAR | PHI

A quick note about the Griffin III/Pierre Garcon hookup you’ve got here: while we think the effect of the quarterback/receiver hookup has largely been exaggerated in fantasy football circles, it does have a tendency to make your team somewhat more inconsistent than comparable scoring duos from different NFL teams. But if you like the players at both ends of the connection, we do not see any need to make a change because of it.

RB Summary:

Nice work here. We like both your starting running backs, as our projections indicate that they give you a combined 4.0 point-per-game advantage over an average opponent in this league. Our projections have Arian Foster ranked first and Marshawn Lynch ranked 15th.

Your bench also looks good. We love Maurice Jones-Drew as a third running back; he’s a likely flex starter. We also very much approve of the selection of Rashad Jennings, and not just as insurance for Maurice Jones-Drew. He’s a fine fourth running back in his own right.

Pierre Thomas is an excellent depth pick, though you may not end up using him much.

WR Summary:

We see all your starters at receiver as below average. Brandon Lloyd is our 27th ranked WR, Pierre Garcon is #31, and we have Malcom Floyd 32nd.

Your bench looks good and should help offset the unexciting starting unit. Reggie Wayne should serve as a very solid fourth receiver. Justin Blackmon should also be solidly above average at WR5.

As we mentioned earlier, the QB/receiver hookup tends to make your team a little more inconsistent. But that’s not the case with the Floyd/Antonio Gates pair you’ve got here. Though the effect is probably negligible, this kind of pairing is likely to make your team more consistent if anything. See this article (which was written before the 2008 season) for more discussion.

Some members of our staff have Brandon Lloyd ranked as high as seventh, which would make him a fine first receiver. Sigmund Bloom defends his high ranking as follows: “Maybe 23 touchdowns is asking too much, but 15 is totally doable for Lloyd in the Randy Moss role. Early reports are that Lloyd and Brady look like they’ve been playing together for years. Reserve your fourth-round pick for him.”

Pierre Garcon is ranked #23 by some of our writers. Heath Cummings reasons, “Garcon finished 22nd amongst receivers last year on a terrible offense. I expect Robert Griffin III to be a better quarterback than any of the guys throwing the ball to Garcon in 2011 which will naturally lead to better numbers.”

TE Summary:

Antonio Gates should be above average as a starting tight end. We have him ranked fourth overall at the position. He’s about 0.5 points per game better than an average starting TE in this league. Fred Davis is a nice backup.

Kicker Summary:

Dan Bailey, our eighth ranked kicker, won’t win the league for you, but he’ll do.

Defense Summary:

The Lions are our #5 ranked defense, so you’re in good shape here.

Isotopes, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Eli Manning, Matt Schaub
RB: Matt Forte, DeMarco Murray, Jamaal Charles, Isaac Redman, Roy Helu
WR: Brandon Marshall, Vincent Jackson, Greg Jennings, Santonio Holmes, Randy Moss
TE: Tony Gonzalez, Dustin Keller
PK: Sebastian Janikowski
TD: Pittsburgh Steelers

Overview:

Old school!

Make no mistake about it: this team is about strength at the running back position. And we think it will be among the top teams in the league. Somewhere Emmitt Smith is smiling.

Nonetheless, we’d be remiss if we didn’t at least mention the relative lack of strength at quarterback and receiver. These are usually survivable weaknesses, but we’d feel better if we knew you were committed to zealously scouring the waiver wire for this year’s emergent players at QB and WR. Getting a breakout player at one or both of those positions would take your already-good team to the next level.

Players we particularly like on this team include Dustin Keller, DeMarco Murray, Jamaal Charles, and Santonio Holmes. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 90 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 80 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 73 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 12 of 2008:

Randy Moss vs. MIA: 125 receiving yards, 3 TD
Matt Forte vs. STL: 146 combined yards, 2 TD
Tony Gonzalez vs. BUF: 113 receiving yards, 1 TD
Greg Jennings vs. NO: 101 receiving yards, 1 TD

QB Summary:

We have Eli Manning rated #11 among quarterbacks, so we’re not even sold on him as a fantasy starter in your league. And we’re not sure that Matt Schaub (our #16-rated QB) is likely to provide much help.

Incidentally, these two have a pretty nice combined schedule and a decent playoff schedule too. If you simply played the one with the better matchup each week, this is the schedule you’d face:

MIA | TB | DEN | TEN | CLE | GB | WAS | DAL | BUF | CIN | JAX | GB | TEN | NE | IND | MIN

RB Summary:

Your starting running back group is a strength, particularly DeMarco Murray as a second running back. We figure them at a combined 1.4 points per game better than an average opponent in this league. Our projections have Matt Forte ranked sixth and Murray ranked at #7.

Your bench also looks good. Jamaal Charles looks great as a third running back; he’s a likely flex starter. Isaac Redman should also be solidly above average at RB4.

Roy Helu is a solid depth pick.

A quick note about the same-team Forte/Brandon Marshall duo you’ve got here. Though the effect is probably negligible, this kind of pairing is likely to make your team more (not less) consistent than a comparable-scoring different-team pair. See this article (which was written before the 2008 season) for more discussion.

Some of our staffers have Matt Forte as high as #4, which would make him an above average first running back. Heath Cummings’s take: “With Forte signed the Bears are now calling Michael Bush a short yardage back. That’s great news for Forte, especially in PPR formats. He has never had success at the goal line anyway, and his fantasy production has never been based on touchdowns. As worried as I was about Forte in June, I’m moving him back where he belongs, in the top five of PPR runnings backs.”

Some members of our staff have Roy Helu ranked as high as 16th, which would make him a great fifth running back and even a legitimate RB2. Jeff Tefertiller defends his high ranking as follows: “The Redskins will want to run the ball early and often. Helu is easily the most talented of the running backs, btu has struggled to surpass the likes of Evan ROyster and Tim Hightower. His ADP is plummeting as the Washington coaching staff has shown no confidence in Helu. ”

WR Summary:

Your starting receivers should, as a unit, be adequate but not great. In particular we like Greg Jennings as a third WR. Brandon Marshall is our seventh ranked WR, Vincent Jackson is #16, and we have Jennings 19th.

Santonio Holmes should serve as a very solid fourth receiver. We also see Randy Moss as an above average WR5.

Note that the above “thoughts” were generated by David Dodds’s projections. Others have different takes:

Some members of our staff have Brandon Marshall ranked as high as third, which would make him an above average first receiver. Jason Wood defends his high ranking as follows: “In Marshall’s two seasons with Jay Cutler, he had 102 and 104 receptions. While you can’t count on that kind of productivity in their new home in Chicago, you can be sure Cutler will target Marshall a disproportionate amount. Marshall has one of the highest floors of any receiver in his tier. ”

Some of our staffers have Vincent Jackson as high as #12, which would make him an above average second receiver. Jeff Pasquino’s take: “Vincent Jackson is a volatile choice to be a WR1 in 2012. Switching quarterbacks, organizations and conferences is a risky proposition. Jackson certainly has the talent to remain a top performer, but there are too many things that have to go just right to make him worth as high of a pick that he will cost in most fantasy drafts this season. Expect a year of adjustment that will likely keep him out of the Top 10. ”

TE Summary:

Tony Gonzalez is just OK as a starting tight end (we have him ranked #9). So the selection of Dustin Keller, who we see as a solid backup, was wise.

Note that the above “thoughts” were generated by David Dodds’s projections. Others have different takes:

Some of our staffers have Tony Gonzalez as high as #4, which would make him an above average first tight end. Jeff Pasquino’s take: “Gonzalez does not have a ton left in the tank, but even an older veteran tight end who is destined for the Hall of Fame is better than most younger options in the league. Gonzalez can work defenses to get open and find soft spots in the secondary, settle down in them and catch 10-15 yard gainers for QB Matt Ryan, especially in key situations. Gonzalez offers little yards after the catch but he is still good enough to catch 70+ balls and score a half-dozen or so touchdowns this year. He’s always in great shape and has missed just one game in 10 years.”

Kicker Summary:

Sebastian Janikowski, our 11th ranked kicker, is below average but probably adequate.

Defense Summary:

When you don’t have an elite defense, one option is a committee approach.

Dillos, rated by footballguys.com

Incidentally- my pick for best draft (after mine of course)- Joe

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Matthew Stafford
RB: LeSean McCoy, Doug Martin, Mark Ingram, Stevan Ridley
WR: Julio Jones, Jordy Nelson, Demaryius Thomas, Titus Young, Jonathan Baldwin, James Jones
TE: Aaron Hernandez, Greg Olsen
PK: Nate Kaeding
TD: Houston Texans

Overview:

In a competitive league, almost every team has a weakness. It’s almost impossible to build a team that is strong at all three core positions (quarterback, running back and wide receiver). As you probably suspect, we perceive your weakness to be at the quarterback position. Of all the deficiencies to have though, this is usually the easiest one to mask.

Footballguys owner David Dodds even recommends you go into your draft with the goal of landing the top RBs and WRs while waiting to grab QBs late. Value-Based Drafting principles also suggest that teams constructed in this manner end up being strong. But for this team to reach it’s full potential, you might need to have a quick trigger finger at the QB position and stay on the look out for good quarterback help. Last year Cam Newton could be had very cheap in August and September, but ended up contributing to a lot of fantasy championships. In 2010 it was Michael Vick and Josh Freeman; in 2009 it was Brett Favre; in 2008, the same could be said of players like Aaron Rodgers, Kurt Warner, and Matt Cassel. Quarterbacks like these can be found every year, and that could be the key to your team’s success.

So although this team isn’t perfect (few are), it should still be a strong contender.

Players we particularly like on this team include Julio Jones, Doug Martin, Aaron Hernandez, and Demaryius Thomas. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 90 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 85 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 76 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 17 of 2011:

Jordy Nelson vs. DET: 162 receiving yards, 3 TD
Matthew Stafford vs. GB: 520 passing yards, 5 TD
Aaron Hernandez vs. BUF: 138 receiving yards, 1 TD
Julio Jones vs. TB: 76 receiving yards, 2 TD

QB Summary:

We expect Matthew Stafford to be a solid starter. According to our projections, he’s the #5 QB, so you should be better off than most teams in the starting quarterback slot.

Despite your strong starting quarterback, we recommend taking a backup. See the end of this report for some specific suggestions.

A quick note about the Stafford/Titus Young hookup you’ve got here: while we think the effect of the quarterback/receiver hookup has largely been exaggerated in fantasy football circles, it does have a tendency to make your team somewhat more inconsistent than comparable scoring duos from different NFL teams. But if you like the players at both ends of the connection, we do not see any need to make a change because of it.

RB Summary:

Nice work here. We like both your starting running backs, as our projections indicate that they give you a combined 1.7 point-per-game advantage over an average opponent in this league. Our projections have LeSean McCoy ranked third and Doug Martin ranked 14th.

Not only do we like Mark Ingram as a third running back, we love that you stole him from the Darren Sproles owner. Stevan Ridley is an excellent RB4.

WR Summary:

Nice work here. We like all your starting receivers, as our projections indicate that they give you a combined 1.5 point-per-game advantage over an average opponent in this league. Julio Jones is our second ranked WR, Jordy Nelson is #13, and we have Demaryius Thomas 17th.

Titus Young should be a good fourth receiver; he’s a likely flex starter. But Jonathan Baldwin is out of his league as a fifth WR.

We’re not sure that James Jones adds much, as you’re already strong at the position and we aren’t convinced he’s roster-worthy in this league anyway.

TE Summary:

As you are well aware, Aaron Hernandez is an elite tight end. We have him ranked third overall at the position. He’s about 1.4 points per game better than an average starting TE in this league. Greg Olsen is an adequate second tight end.

Kicker Summary:

Nate Kaeding, our seventh ranked kicker, won’t win the league for you, but he’ll do.

Defense Summary:

When you don’t have an elite defense, one option is a committee approach.

blitzers, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Tom Brady, Peyton Manning
RB: Frank Gore, Michael Turner, C.J. Spiller, David Wilson
WR: Larry Fitzgerald, Miles Austin, Mike Wallace, Denarius Moore, Robert Meachem, Michael Floyd, Vincent Brown
TE: Brent Celek
PK: Garrett Hartley
TD: Baltimore Ravens

Overview:

We’ll start by complimenting you on your strength at quarterback and receiver. As you know, it’s very difficult in a competitive league to assemble a team that is strong at QB, RB, and WR, so just about every team will have a weakness. As you probably suspect, we perceive yours to be at running back.

This is often a tough weakness to mask, though, so you must be prepared to be very active in waivers and trades to change the composition of this team. Most drafts go very deep at the RB position and that usually means there are just table scraps left for those weak at the position.

But the good news is that running backs do emerge every year post-draft. Last year guys like Peyton Hillis, Mike Tolbert, and LeGarrette Blount all could be had dirt cheap at the draft. In fact most likely were not rostered before the season started. Yet all of these players could have taken a weakness and made it into a strength for their prospective owners. This is the move you are going to need to make this year to take this team to a clear contender.

Players we particularly like on this team include Denarius Moore and Garrett Hartley. We have both these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 75 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 60 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 41 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 2 of 2011:

Miles Austin vs. SF: 143 receiving yards, 3 TD
Denarius Moore vs. BUF: 146 receiving yards, 1 TD
Michael Turner vs. PHI: 146 combined yards, 1 TD
Tom Brady vs. SD: 423 passing yards, 3 TD
Larry Fitzgerald vs. WAS: 133 receiving yards, 1 TD
Mike Wallace vs. SEA: 126 receiving yards, 1 TD

QB Summary:

You don’t need us to tell you this, but we’ll tell you anyway: Tom Brady should ensure that your production at the quarterback position is among the best in the league. We have him as the #2 QB according to your scoring rules, and we figure he gives you about a 1.9 point-per-game advantage over an average starting QB.

Peyton Manning, who we have rated as the #12 QB, is a fine backup.

Incidentally, Manning has what we project as a neutral matchup (CIN) during Brady’s bye.

RB Summary:

We see both your starters at running back as below average. Our projections have Frank Gore ranked 19th and Michael Turner ranked 24th.

Not only do we like C.J. Spiller as a third running back, we love that you stole him from the Fred Jackson owner. We really don’t like David Wilson at fourth running back.

Some members of our staff have Frank Gore ranked as high as 13th. Maurile Tremblay defends his high ranking as follows: “Gore was the No. 12 fantasy RB last season. The fantasy community is expecting a significant drop-off, viewing him as a middling RB2 rather than a borderline RB1, but I think the expectation is premature. Gore can’t keep putting up big numbers forever, but I’m betting he’s got another year in the tank, and the 49ers plans to reduce his workload will be forgotten when they need to put the ball in Gore’s hands to win games.”

Some members of our staff have Michael Turner ranked as high as 15th, which would make him an above average second running back. Mark Wimer defends his high ranking as follows: “Even though the Falcons are becoming a more pass-oriented team, they still plan to feed Turner the ball around 70% of the available carries – he should be a solid RB2 even in PPR leagues thanks to his central role on the Falcons’ rushing attack. I think he’s underrated this year in fantasy circles, especially in non-PPR formats. Even with the aerial show by Matt Ryan and company during preseason, Turner will still get his carries to close out games once Ryan and company have put things out of reach for the opposition. ”

Some members of our staff have David Wilson ranked as high as 25th, which would make him a great fourth running back and even a legitimate RB3. Jeff Tefertiller defends his high ranking as follows: “Wilson will add excitement to the Giant offense. New York has supported two two good fantasy backs in the past and could do so again this year. I expect the rookie to overtake Bradshaw at some point this year. His speed will add a new diminsion to the Giant offense. Also, let’s remember that Bradshaw has experienced foot problems often over the past few years. ”

WR Summary:

Your starting receiver group is a strength, particularly Larry Fitzgerald as a top receiver. Fitzgerald is our third ranked WR, Miles Austin is #15, and we have Mike Wallace 26th.

Your bench also looks good. Tough to do better than Denarius Moore at WR4; he’s a likely flex starter. Robert Meachem will also be among the best WR5s in the league.

Since you’re strong at the position, you probably don’t absolutely need to roster more than five players here. Of your remaining guys, we like Michael Floyd the best, but you should keep the one you think has the best chance of putting up starter numbers. The rest might be considered expendable if you find you need roster space elsewhere.

TE Summary:

Brent Celek, who we have ranked #10, is below average but probably adequate as a starting tight end. You might get by with only Celek, but some additional help here probably wouldn’t hurt.

Kicker Summary:

With Garrett Hartley, you should be above average at the position.

Defense Summary:

The Ravens are probably not a difference-maker at defense, but they should be OK.

When you don’t have an elite defense, one option is a committee approach

phoenix cowboys, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Tony Romo, Jay Cutler
RB: Darren McFadden, Trent Richardson, Ryan Mathews, Reggie Bush, Rashard Mendenhall, Jahvid Best
WR: Dez Bryant, Wes Welker, Kenny Britt, Randall Cobb
TE: Jermichael Finley, Jason Witten
PK: Alex Henery
TD: Philadelphia Eagles

Overview:

With three Cowboys on board, your team appears to be appropriately named, so congratulations on that. Now on to the analysis…

Let’s start by remarking that we appreciate your old-school leanings: you have a team marked by strength at the running back position. Because the position is so sought after, a team constructed like this usually has a chance to make the playoffs. But with the quarterback and wide receiver both being less strong, you may need to do something to change the outlook of this team. Your deficiencies are likely to show themselves through the bye weeks, so try to manuever early in improving the quarterback and/or receiver positions before week four.

Keep an eye out for quarterbacks like Cam Newton last year, Michael Vick and Josh Freeman in 2010, Brett Favre in 2009, Matt Cassel and Kurt Warner in 2008, and Derek Anderson in 2007. All were available cheap in August, and all contributed to fantasy championship teams. Similarly, wide receivers like Victor Cruz and Laurent Robinson were available after a lot of the drafts. Landing some of this year’s top waiver players would be a huge help, so pay close attention to increased workloads, targets, injuries, etc.

Players we particularly like on this team include Trent Richardson, Reggie Bush, and the Eagles defense. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 80 percent chance of  making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 65 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 51 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 3 of 2011:

Wes Welker vs. BUF: 217 receiving yards, 2 TD
Darren McFadden vs. NYJ: 178 combined yards, 2 TD
Ryan Mathews vs. KC: 149 combined yards, 2 TD
Jermichael Finley vs. CHI: 85 receiving yards, 3 TD

QB Summary:

We have Tony Romo rated #9 among quarterbacks, which makes him a viable starter if not an exciting one. And we’re not crazy about Jay Cutler (ranked #17 among quarterbacks) as a backup. If Romo turns in the season we expect, this position won’t ruin you, but it probably won’t be a strength either. And if things go wrong, it could be a long year at QB.

Incidentally, Cutler has what we project as a neutral matchup (JAX) during Romo’s bye.

A quick note about the Romo/Dez Bryant hookup you’ve got here: while we think the effect of the quarterback/receiver hookup has largely been exaggerated in fantasy football circles, it does have a tendency to make your team somewhat more inconsistent than comparable scoring duos from different NFL teams. But if you like the players at both ends of the connection, we do not see any need to make a change because of it.

RB Summary:

Your starting running back group is a strength, particularly Trent Richardson as a second running back. Our projections have Darren McFadden ranked at #4 and Richardson ranked 10th.

Your bench also looks good. Tough to do better than Ryan Mathews at RB3; he’s a likely flex starter. Likewise, Reggie Bush should be excellent at RB4.

Since you’re strong at the position, you probably don’t absolutely need to roster more than four players here. Of your remaining guys, we like Rashard Mendenhall the best, but you should keep the one you think has the best chance of putting up starter numbers. The rest might be considered expendable if you find you need roster space elsewhere.

WR Summary:

We see all your starters at receiver as below average. Dez Bryant is our #11 ranked receiver, Wes Welker is #14, and we have Kenny Britt 34th.

We don’t particularly like Randall Cobb as a fourth receiver.

We might suggest adding a bit more depth here. See the end of the report for some suggestions on who to pick up.

TE Summary:

Though neither of them is elite, you have two viable starting tight ends in Jermichael Finley and Jason Witten. If one of them breaks out, or if you play the matchups well, you’ll probably get good production from the position.

Kicker Summary:

Alex Henery, our 10th ranked kicker, is below average but probably adequate.

Defense Summary:

The Eagles are our #3 ranked defense, so you’re in good shape here.

sapornos, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Drew Brees, Matt Flynn
RB: Adrian Peterson, Donald Brown, Kevin Smith, Daniel Thomas
WR: Victor Cruz, Steve Smith, Dwayne Bowe, Marques Colston, Mike Williams, Anquan Boldin
TE: Vernon Davis, Owen Daniels
PK: Mason Crosby
TD: San Francisco 49ers

Overview:

We’ll start by complimenting you on your strength at quarterback and receiver. As you know, it’s very difficult in a competitive league to assemble a team that is strong at QB, RB, and WR, so just about every team will have a weakness. As you probably suspect, we perceive yours to be at running back.

This is often a tough weakness to mask, though, so you must be prepared to be very active in waivers and trades to change the composition of this team. Most drafts go very deep at the RB position and that usually means there are just table scraps left for those weak at the position.

But the good news is that running backs do emerge every year post-draft. Last year guys like Peyton Hillis, Mike Tolbert, and LeGarrette Blount all could be had dirt cheap at the draft. In fact most likely were not rostered before the season started. Yet all of these players could have taken a weakness and made it into a strength for their prospective owners. This is the move you are going to need to make this year to take this team to a clear contender.

Players we particularly like on this team include Steve Smith, Dwayne Bowe, Mike Williams, and Mason Crosby. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 75 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 60 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 45 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 17 of 2011:

Matt Flynn vs. DET: 480 passing yards, 6 TD
Marques Colston vs. CAR: 145 receiving yards, 2 TD
Drew Brees vs. CAR: 389 passing yards, 5 TD
Victor Cruz vs. DAL: 178 receiving yards, 1 TD

QB Summary:

You don’t need us to tell you this, but we’ll tell you anyway: Drew Brees should ensure that your production at the quarterback position is among the best in the league. We have him as the #3 QB according to your scoring rules, and we figure he gives you about a 1.9 point-per-game advantage over an average starting QB.

As of now, our projections don’t indicate that Matt Flynn will be a viable backup quarterback. While the presence of Brees minimizes the need for a top backup, we might recommend taking a quick peek at the free agent list to see if you can find some help. We’ll offer some specific suggestions at the end of the report.

Incidentally, Flynn has what we project as a good matchup (NE) during Brees’s bye.

A quick note about the Brees/Marques Colston hookup you’ve got here: while we think the effect of the quarterback/receiver hookup has largely been exaggerated in fantasy football circles, it does have a tendency to make your team somewhat more inconsistent than comparable scoring duos from different NFL teams. But if you like the players at both ends of the connection, we do not see any need to make a change because of it.

RB Summary:

We see both your starters at running back as below average. Our projections have Adrian Peterson ranked at #20 and Donald Brown ranked at #21.

Kevin Smith is a little below average as a third running back. Daniel Thomas is also a liability at fourth running back.

Some of our staffers have Adrian Peterson as high as #9, which would make him a fine first running back. Andrew Garda’s take: “Even 80% of Peterson is better than 99.9% of the backs out there. We don’t know what he’ll look like coming back from dual ACL & MCL injuries but be sure he is motivated to come back hard. Healthy, he could the number one back on this list. We’ll have to see how healthy he is in camp. That said, running uphill against Percy Harvin is a great sign. You can’t do that if you don’t have a knee in good shape. Yes, the team put him on the PUP list, but that’s just caution. It’s smart. And it will scare off owners in your league. I will add this – the more owners in your league scared off by AP’s injury the better chance you have at a RB1 at RB2 prices.”

Kevin Smith is ranked #21 by some of our writers, which would make him an above average third running back. Anthony Borbely reasons, “Mikel Leshoure will be suspended for the first 2 games and nobody knows when Jahvid Best will return, if at all. Smith will likely carry the load for the first two games and after that expect some kind of a timeshare with Leshoure. Smith is also the best pass protecting RB on the Lions and is likely to be playing in passing situations. Right now I think you have to assume Best will not play. For now consider Smith a borderline RB2. ”

Daniel Thomas is ranked #32 by some of our writers, which would make him an above average fourth running back. Mark Wimer reasons, “Reggie Bush headlined for the Dolphins last year, and he looks set to do that again this year. However, the passing game is shaky at best (and may feature a rookie quarterback for all or at least some of the year) and Daniel Thomas will likely share the load with Bush. This doesn’t look like a situation that will produce optimum fantasy points for team owners, folks, and Thomas is likely the junior partner in the committee. ”

WR Summary:

Your starting receivers should, as a unit, be adequate but not great. In particular we like Steve Smith as a second WR. Victor Cruz is our #8 ranked receiver, Smith is #10, and we have Dwayne Bowe 20th.

Your bench looks good and should help offset the unexciting starting unit. Tough to do better than Marques Colston at WR4; he’s a likely flex starter. Mike Williams should also be solidly above average at WR5.

Anquan Boldin is an excellent depth pick, though you may not end up using him much.

Some of our staffers have Victor Cruz as high as #5, which would make him an above average first receiver. Mark Wimer’s take: “I think 2011 (82/1536/9) was just the beginning for Cruz – with Mario Manningham out of the picture in New York he could easily see 100 receptions, which should translate into 1,400+ yards even if his lofty 18.7 average yards per catch comes back down to a more usual average over the coming season. I’ve got him down for 85-90 receptions for 1,400-1,500 yards and nine-to-ten TDs heading into OTA’s/mini-camp season. The foot injury to Hakeem Nicks and conflicting reports about when he’ll be ready are other reasons to be bullish on Cruz’s 2012 upside.”

TE Summary:

Vernon Davis should be above average as a starting tight end. We have him ranked fifth overall at the position. Owen Daniels is an adequate second tight end.

Some of our staffers have Vernon Davis as high as #4, which would make him an above average first tight end. Mark Wimer’s take: “He has the talent to be a dominant tight end in this league, but his team was 31st in passing attempts last year (451). Davis won’t overtake Jimmy Graham (662 passing attempts last year in New Orleans) or Rob Gronkowski (612) in fantasy production, even if we see an uptick in the number of passing attempts from the 49ers. ”

Some members of our staff have Owen Daniels ranked as high as seventh, which would make him a great second tight end and even a legitimate TE1. Maurile Tremblay defends his high ranking as follows: “After a couple of top-ten seasons in 2007 and 2008, Owen Daniels was among the league’s best tight ends in 2009 before tearing his ACL midway through the season. In eight games that season, he was on pace to equal Antonio Gates’ production as a top three fantasy TE. He wasn’t the same in 2010, but bounced back somewhat in 2011, and should play a big role in the offense in 2012. He should be a low-end TE1 if he can stay healthy.”

Kicker Summary:

With Mason Crosby, you should be above average at the position.

Defense Summary:

The 49ers are our #4 ranked defense, so you’re in good shape here.

phinest, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Aaron Rodgers, Andrew Luck
RB: Steven Jackson, Shonn Greene, Jacquizz Rodgers, Chris Wells, Ben Tate, Robert Turbin
WR: Andre Johnson, Hakeem Nicks, Antonio Brown, Torrey Smith, Santana Moss
TE: Rob Gronkowski, Jacob Tamme
PK: Andrew- my fault, I guess I forgot to add the kicker here. Sorry my man!
TD: Green Bay Packers

Overview:

We’ll start by complimenting you on your strength at quarterback, receiver, and tight end. As you know, it’s very difficult in a competitive league to assemble a team that is strong at QB, RB, and WR, so just about every team will have a weakness. As you probably suspect, we perceive yours to be at running back.

In 2012, that’s not an instant fantasy team killer like it might have been five years ago. And in this particular case, we absolutely think you’re strong enough elsewhere to overcome it. You’ve definitely got a good team here, but we’d feel better if we knew you were committed to keeping an eye out for the 2012 version of 2010’s Peyton Hillis or LeGarrette Blount or 2009’s Ricky Williams, Jamaal Charles, or Fred Jackson.

Players we particularly like on this team include Hakeem Nicks, Torrey Smith, Antonio Brown, and the Packers defense. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 99 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 90 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 83 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 14 of 2011:

Rob Gronkowski vs. WAS: 160 receiving yards, 2 TD
Shonn Greene vs. KC: 187 combined yards, 1 TD
Antonio Brown vs. CLE: 151 receiving yards, 1 TD
Steven Jackson vs. SEA: 123 combined yards, 1 TD
Hakeem Nicks vs. DAL: 163 receiving yards

QB Summary:

You don’t need us to tell you this, but we’ll tell you anyway: Aaron Rodgers should ensure that your production at the quarterback position is among the best in the league. We have him as the #1 QB according to your scoring rules, and we figure he gives you about a 3.6 point-per-game advantage over an average starting QB.

Our projections don’t show Andrew Luck as being a top-notch backup, but the issue will be moot as long as Rodgers stays healthy.

Incidentally, Luck has what we project as a neutral matchup (JAX) during Rodgers’s bye.

RB Summary:

We see both your starters at running back as below average. Our projections have Steven Jackson ranked eighth and Shonn Greene ranked 22nd.

We don’t particularly like Jacquizz Rodgers as a third running back. Chris Wells also figures to be a bit iffy as a fourth RB.

Though some teams will probably be content to roster as few as four players here, it was not a bad idea to take a few extras because you’re not particularly strong overall at the position. Of your remaining guys, we like Ben Tate the best, but you should keep the one you think has the best chance of putting up starter numbers. The rest might be considered expendable if you find you need roster space elsewhere.

Some of our staffers have Steven Jackson as high as #7, which would make him a fine first running back. Anthony Borbely’s take: “Jackson is nearing the end but he should dominate touches for the Rams and I think he has another season of borderline RB1 numbers in him. ”

Some of our staffers have Shonn Greene as high as #14, which would make him an above average second running back. Mark Wimer’s take: “He is going to get a lot of carries, but his relative lack of scoring (two, two, and six rushing TDs the last three years) forces him down my board. In some good news, though, Greene has seen an increased number of passing targets (4, 24, 41) and receptions (0, 16, 30) in each of his seasons, making him viable as a running back #2 in the PPR paradigm. He is expected to see a heavy diet of touches for the Jets this year as their ‘grinder’ back. However, the horrid state of the passing attack has me moving Greene down my boards – he’s going to see a LOT of seven-man fronts given how awful SanchBow/Techez have looked throwing the football during preseason. ”

Jacquizz Rodgers is ranked #15 by some of our writers, which would make him a great third running back and even a legitimate RB2. Jeff Tefertiller reasons, “This could be the year Rodgers surpasses Michael Turner for touches in the Falcon offense. Rodgers’ workload will increase with or without a Turner injury as the Falcons have talked about running a No Huddle offense more this season. Rodgers looked very quick last year and his receiving ability adds a new dynamic to the Atlanta pass offense. ”

WR Summary:

Nice work here. We like all your starting receivers, as our projections indicate that they give you a combined 1.1 point-per-game advantage over an average opponent in this league. Andre Johnson is our #4 ranked receiver, Hakeem Nicks is #9, and we have Antonio Brown 23rd.

Your bench also looks good. We love Torrey Smith as a fourth receiver; he’s a likely flex starter. Santana Moss, on the other hand, is an average-at-best fifth WR.

Santana Moss is ranked #40 by some of our writers, which would make him a great fifth receiver and even a legitimate WR4. Steve Holloway reasons, “Talented wide receiver who has reported in excellent condition and matched up with talented rookie quarterback could reap major benefits at his ADP of WR50. Moss has finished in the top twenty wide receivers in two of the last four seasons and has two top ten seasons within the last ten years.”

TE Summary:

As you are well aware, Rob Gronkowski is an elite tight end. We have him ranked second overall at the position. He’s about 2.9 points per game better than an average starting TE in this league. Jacob Tamme is a nice backup.

Kicker Summary:

Don’t forget to pick up a kicker before the season starts.

Defense Summary:

The Packers are our #2 ranked defense, so you’re in good shape here.

Atoms, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Cam Newton, Andy Dalton
RB: Chris Johnson, Darren Sproles, Ahmad Bradshaw, Peyton Hillis, Ryan Williams
WR: Calvin Johnson, Roddy White, Darrius Heyward-Bey, Eric Decker, Danny Amendola, Golden Tate
TE: Jermaine Gresham
PK: Stephen Gostkowski
TD: Seattle Seahawks

Overview:

In a competitive league, almost every team has a weakness. It’s almost impossible to build a team that is strong at all three core positions (quarterback, running back and wide receiver). Your backs and receivers look just fine. And while it’s probably not accurate to describe a team with Cam Newton as weak at the position, we do think you’re dangerously thin. As Tom Brady reminded us of in 2008, even quarterbacks with spotless health records can go down at any time. Thus the lack of depth at QB is what’s keeping this team from getting our full endorsement.

So although this team isn’t perfect (few are), it should still be a strong contender.

Players we particularly like on this team include Roddy White, Cam Newton, Darren Sproles, Ryan Williams, and Stephen Gostkowski. We have all these guys ranked ahead of where they are typically being drafted.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 99 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 90 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 86 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 15 of 2011:

Calvin Johnson vs. OAK: 214 receiving yards, 2 TD
Roddy White vs. JAX: 135 receiving yards, 2 TD
Darrius Heyward-Bey vs. DET: 155 receiving yards, 1 TD
Darren Sproles vs. MIN: 112 combined yards, 1 TD
Peyton Hillis vs. ARI: 108 combined yards, 1 TD

QB Summary:

We expect Cam Newton to be a solid starter. According to our projections, he’s the #4 QB, so you should be better off than most teams in the starting quarterback slot.

We’re not excited about Andy Dalton (our #22 QB) as a backup, but he’ll probably be adequate.

Incidentally, Dalton has what we project as a bad matchup (CLE) during Newton’s bye. – Not sure how facing the Browns is bad, but ok…

RB Summary:

Your starting running backs should, as a unit, be adequate but not great. In particular we like Darren Sproles as a second RB. Our projections have Chris Johnson ranked fifth and Sproles ranked at #13.

Your bench looks good and should help offset the unexciting starting unit. Ahmad Bradshaw looks great as a third running back; he’s a likely flex starter. We also very much approve of the selection of Peyton Hillis, and not just because you can hold the Jamaal Charles owner hostage. He’s a fine fourth running back in his own right.

Ryan Williams is an excellent depth pick, though you may not end up using him much.

WR Summary:

Your starting receiver group is a strength, particularly Calvin Johnson as a top receiver. We figure them at a combined 4.5 points per game better than an average opponent in this league. Johnson is our #1 ranked receiver, Roddy White is #6, and we have Darrius Heyward-Bey 29th.

Your bench also looks good. We love Eric Decker as a fourth receiver. Danny Amendola, on the other hand, is an average-at-best fifth WR.

We’re not sure that Golden Tate adds much, as you’re already strong at the position and we aren’t convinced he’s roster-worthy in this league anyway.

TE Summary:

With only Jermaine Gresham, who we don’t think is starter-quality in this league, this position is likely to be a trouble spot for you all season.

Kicker Summary:

With Stephen Gostkowski, you should be above average at the position.

Defense Summary:

The Seahawks are probably not a difference-maker at defense, but they should be OK.

When you don’t have an elite defense, one option is a committee approach

And last but not least, my favorite one! And the one I am guessing everyone has been waiting on…

spv, rated by footballguys.com

Your team is currently being rated by the projections of David Dodds Switch to: Maurile Tremblay Bob Henry Jason Wood


QB: Michael Vick, Joe Flacco
RB: Michael Bush, Cedric Benson, Justin Forsett, Kahlil Bell
WR: DeSean Jackson, Jeremy Maclin, Sidney Rice, Jason Avant, Plaxico Burress
TE: Lance Kendricks, Dallas Clark, Martellus Bennett
PK: David Akers
TD: Dallas Cowboys

Overview:

Let us say this as nicely as we can. This team is brutal. It is below average and/or too thin at all three core positions (quarterback, running back and receiver).

To make this team into a serious contender, you are going to need to be extremely active in trades and on the waiver wire. You esentially need to turn over significant parts of this roster. Last year running backs like Michael Bush, Darren Sproles, and Fred Jackson all could be had dirt cheap at the draft. Additionally, wide receivers like Victor Cruz and Laurent Robinson were available after a lot of the drafts. Quarterbacks like Cam Newton last season, Michael Vick in 2010, Brett Favre in 2009, Matt Cassel in 2008, and Derek Anderson in 2007 could all be had cheap just after draft time. You are likely going to need to land many of this year’s top waiver plays to make any significant noise, so pay close attention to increased workloads, targets, injuries, etc.

Bottom line:

  • With great inseason management, we think you have about a 55 percent chance of  making the playoffs.
  • With good inseason management, we think you have about a 30 percent chance of making the playoffs.
  • With average inseason management, we think you have a 1 percent chance of making the playoffs.

In any event, we wish you the best of luck. Here’s hoping all your weeks are like week 3 of 2010:

Michael Vick vs. JAX: 291 passing yards, 4 TD
DeSean Jackson vs. JAX: 153 receiving yards, 1 TD
Cedric Benson vs. CAR: 90 combined yards, 2 TD
Jeremy Maclin vs. JAX: 83 receiving yards, 2 TD

QB Summary:

We have Michael Vick rated #6 among quarterbacks, which makes him a viable starter if not an exciting one. And we’re not crazy about Joe Flacco (ranked #21 among quarterbacks) as a backup. If Vick turns in the season we expect, this position won’t ruin you, but it probably won’t be a strength either. And if things go wrong, it could be a long year at QB.

Incidentally, Flacco has what we project as a bad matchup (HOU) during Vick’s bye.

A quick note about the same-team hookups (Vick/DeSean Jackson, Vick/Jeremy Maclin, and Vick/Jason Avant) you’ve got here: while we think the effect of the quarterback/receiver hookup has largely been exaggerated in fantasy football circles, it does have a tendency to make your team somewhat more inconsistent than comparable scoring duos from different NFL teams. But if you like the players at both ends of the connection, we do not see any need to make a change because of it.

RB Summary:

We see both your starters at running back as below average. Our projections have Michael Bush ranked at #32 and Cedric Benson ranked 38th.

Justin Forsett is a very weak third running back. Kahlil Bell is also a liability at fourth running back.

Some of our staffers have Michael Bush as high as #25. Maurile Tremblay’s take: “Matt Forte will be the lead back as long as he stays healthy, but Michael Bush is an effective runner who will have a role in the offense. He may get some goal-line carries. And if Forte misses time, Bush should be a fantasy starter.”

Some of our staffers have Cedric Benson as high as #30. Jason Wood’s take: “It’s a rare thing for a veteran RB to get a shot after he’s been on the free agent wire for some time, but it appears the Packers are sufficiently worried about James Starks to give Benson the nod. He seems like an odd fit for the Packers offense, so I wouldn’t go crazy with Benson as a sleeper. ”

WR Summary:

We see all your starters at receiver as below average. DeSean Jackson is our 22nd ranked WR, Jeremy Maclin is #25, and we have Sidney Rice 50th.

Jason Avant is a very weak fourth receiver; he’s a likely flex starter.

We might suggest adding a bit more depth here. See the end of the report for some suggestions on who to pick up.

As we mentioned earlier, the QB/receiver hookup tends to make your team a little more inconsistent. But that’s not the case with the Jackson/Jeremy Maclin, Jackson/Jason Avant, Maclin/DeSean Jackson, Maclin/Jason Avant, Avant/DeSean Jackson, and Avant/Jeremy Maclin pairs you’ve got here. Though the effect is probably negligible, this kind of pairing is likely to make your team more consistent if anything. See this article (which was written before the 2008 season) for more discussion.

Some of our staffers have DeSean Jackson as high as #18. Jeff Pasquino’s take: “The Eagles have a high-powered passing game, and the flashy DeSean Jackson often overshadows the consistent performances of Jeremy Maclin. Jackson is the home run hitter who doesn’t always connect every week, making Maclin the safer fantasy WR2 – but if you want big play potential and punt return options then DeSean is your guy.”

Some members of our staff have Jeremy Maclin ranked as high as 15th, which would make him an above average second receiver. Jeff Haseley defends his high ranking as follows: “It would not surprise me in the least if Maclin becomes even more involved in the Eagles passing game this year. I fully expect him to outplay his teammate DeSean Jackson. If he can find the end zone more often, he could be a Top 15 WR. ”

Some of our staffers have Sidney Rice as high as #29, which would make him a fine third receiver. Steve Holloway’s take: “Extremely talented wide receiver who has only one season in five where he played all 16 games. That year, he had 83 catches for 1,312 yards and 8 TDs. However, in none of his other years has he topped 500 receiving yards. Boom or bust selection at ADP of WR36.”

TE Summary:

This is a pretty motley crew. We don’t see Lance Kendricks as a viable starter or Dallas Clark as an above average backup. Help is needed.

Some of our staffers have Lance Kendricks as high as #20. Anthony Borbely’s take: “Kendricks has as much upside as anyone in the mid-to lower TE2 range. He got off to a slow start last year and only had 28 receptions all year. Kendricks figures to improve in his second year but how much remains to be seen. If you want to wait until late to grab a backup, one with the upside Kendricks possesses is not a bad option. ”

Kicker Summary:

With David Akers, you should be above average at the position.

Defense Summary:

When you don’t have an elite defense, one option is a committee approach

Comments
  1. Dave (Star Warriors) says:

    I guess that makes me the favorite?

    At least they like the South Philly Vikings kicker!

    • gingerdad1 says:

      I like how they called his TE’s a “motley crew” that was awesome. you and I are both rated at 99% to make the playoffs so I would say you are in the top 2.

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